Friday, February 22, 2008

Publication of The Road To Dallas

The Road to Dallas will be available within a week or two (simply click the link in the list of books to the right if you want to order it.) I will also be creating a site for it (but that must await my return from some vacation next week.) Meanwhile, the first copy has arrived, and, inevitably, it turns out that some editorial slips involving factual errors have occurred. There are many ways for this to happen in this automated age, but I take full responsibility, and simply look forward to correcting them all in future editions. (Some indeed have been corrected for the second printing, which is already beginning.) Here are the problems I have identified so far, and I shall update as any others emerge.

p. 59, first paragraph: “at his Miami Sans Souci casino” should be “at his Havana Sans Souci casino.”

p. 107, sentence before note 28: “by his predecessor (Helms)” should read, “by his predecessor (Dulles)" .

p. 225, “Butler, amazingly, was not called by the commission or, apparently, even interviewed by the FBI—“ should read: Butler, amazingly, was not called by the commission or interviewed at any length by the FBI—“

p, 403 2nd paragraph, “during the remainder of the 1970s” should be “during the remainder of the 1960s.”

Enjoy the book!


Anonymous said...

I will be looking for the book... I've been studying the assassination for 40 years, read the Report and the 26 volumes in college, have tried to make sense out of it. I'm extremely anxious to see if Professor Kaiser has finally solved it. From what I hear, he thinks Oswald was the lone would take a very great deal to convince me at this point that there was only one gunman, but I'm open to persuasion. Good luck with the book!

C. Norton said...

There's an interesting pattern--when a professional historian takes a hard look at the evidence in the assassination he comes out arguing for conspiracy. These include: David Wrone, Michael Kurtz, Walt Brown, Phillip Melanson, Gerald McKnight.
Any validity to this observation?

Anonymous said...

Do you have a comment about Professor David R. Wrone's lengthy critical review of your article in the Chronicle of Higher Education publication?

Mark Krone said...

I have just finished reading The Road to Dallas. The story line connecting anti-Castro Cubans (and Americans), far-right-wingers, and several leaders of organized crime to Oswald and Ruby was riveting as was the James Elroy-like descriptions of 1963 Dallas (strip clubs, informants, mercenaries, etc.)

The motives from two separate but colluding groups (anti-Castro & the Mob) is the strongest element of the book. But the question remains: if one reads this book without knowledge of the conclusion that JFK was killed by a conspiracy, the sum total of it still does not convince. Associations are made but too many questions remain for me to move from agnostic to believer. Still, I greatly enjoyed it and I salute you on this Everest of research.