Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Health Care Update

As of Tuesday morning, it looks as if the Republicans in the Senate--like those in the House--will have to delay their initial scheduled vote on their health care measure.  The situation is exactly parallel to the House, insofar as both conservatives and moderates have refused to go along with the bill as written.  Once again, the mainstream media is jubilantly suggesting that the plan is bound to fail.  I  am sure however that the recess will become the occasion for an all0oyut pressure campaign against all the Republican Senators in an effort to reduce opposition to 2 and allow the Vice President to break the tie. There will be more cosmetic changes in the bill, as in the House, but I still think something like it will pass.  If it doesn't, we will have years of chaos as the Administration tries to destroy Obamacare from within.

3 comments:

Bozon said...

Professor
Thanks for this. We all know that ACA was a symptom of our problems rather than even a move toward a solution.

Too many institutional barriers, not even ones directly related to healthcare, stand in the way of something like a more socialized medicine system here.

My high premiums had been rocketing up, over the past few years, since I was one of those who who had to pay premiums, rather than have a subsidy.

Imagine how much that program has been costing governments, presumably both state and federal, which pick up the tab for increases in subsidized costs, and thus costing the average person everywhere here, in the last analysis, for those who are subsidized, the majority of ACA insureds?

It seems to have been a sort of wealth transfer from the middle to the upper income group, to pay for the lower's care.

All the best

PJ Cats said...

I frankly don't see how, with an administration like Trump's, we WON'T have years of chaos. To anybody who wonders what chaos looks like, well, this is it. As for the reasons, don't assume conspiracy when mere incompetence will do.

Unknown said...

Neither the ACA or the recent House and Senate versions to replace it get to the crux of the issue of health care, which is the high cost of care for both the sick and the well. Those feeding at the health care trough are entrenched in Washington, keeping their advocates in office to promote their agendas and increase their profits at the expense of affordable health care for the many. There are solutions to reduce the cost of health care besides a single payer. All are politically infeasible. When current leaders state that their plans to reduce health care costs will save people money, they are not lying. Those ACA replacement plans will save money for the rich, and for the poor, who will have no health care costs because they will have no health care plan.